Tips On How To Shop In A Smart Way

Grocery Shopping

These steps will give you the knowledge and know-how to navigate the supermarket aisles and select the healthier snack and meal options.

STEP ONE: Shop the perimeter first

  • Pick Plenty of Produce – Make sure to choose a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables (Deep green, yellow, red, purple, and blue!)
  • Make a stop at the meat, poultry, and fish counters – Shop for the lean cuts of meat. Look for “round” or “loin” when shopping for beef, and “loin” or “leg” when shopping for pork or lamb. Make sure the beef is labeled “lean” or “extra lean.” Try Canadian Bacon or Turkey. Go skinless with your chicken, and select fish high in “omega 3’s” such as salmon and tuna.

 

STEP TWO: Don’t forget the Dairy

  • Choose 1 percent or skim for milk and yogurts (Go Greek!)
  • Go for “reduced fat” or “part skim” for cheese, cottage cheese, and sour cream
  • Try “lite” margarine or whipped butter
  • Tofu is low-calorie and high in protein

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Tips And Tricks To Loose Weight

Lady carrying a weighting scale

Myth #1: All Carbs make you fat.

Carbohydrates, also known as “carbs,” should never be avoided, but it is important to understand that not all carbs are alike. Carbs are your body’s primary energy source and play a crucial role in your body’s overall health. Carbs are an important part of a healthy diet, but there’s much discussion about the “good” and “bad” carbohydrates.

 

So how do you know which is which? Carbohydrates can be either simple (“bad” carbs) or complex (“good” carbs) based on their chemical makeup and what your body does with them. “Bad” carbs are generally foods with refined carbohydrates, which means during processing, the essential layers of the whole grain kernel are taken out (fiber, vitamins, and minerals) and what is left over is a plain starch or white flour and added sugars. “Good” carbs are used to describe foods that use the “whole grain kernel”. Continue reading “Tips And Tricks To Loose Weight”

What Your BMI Doesn’t Tell You

BMI

Body mass index (BMI) has been used as the standard for recording obesity statistics since the early 1980s.  Further, this method has been used consistently in most clinical and behavioral studies and is the key measure to assess weight loss programs.

 

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Center for Health Statistics, two-thirds of the United States are overweight, and one-third is obese. Obesity is a prevalent public health problem in the United States and has been surging in the past 20 years. Excess body fat can lead to many different co-morbidities and chronic diseases.

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Let’s Try Caramelized Balsamic Brussel Sprouts!

Brussel Sprouts

The cancer protection we get from Brussels sprouts is largely related to four specific glucosinolates found in this cruciferous vegetable: glucoraphanin, glucobrassicin, sinigrin, and gluconasturtiin.

Health Tip:

The cancer protection we get from Brussels sprouts is largely related to four specific glucosinolates found in this cruciferous vegetable: glucoraphanin, glucobrassicin, sinigrin, and gluconasturtiin. Research has shown that Brussels sprouts offer these cancer-preventive components in a special combination Continue reading “Let’s Try Caramelized Balsamic Brussel Sprouts!”

Veggie Wheat-Berry Salad It Is!

Veggie Wheat-Berry Salad

Health Tip:

Wheat berries are short, plump whole-wheat kernels loaded with nutrients. Eating grains in their whole form allows you to get all the nutrients that you miss when the grains are processed into bread, pasta, and pastries. Wheat berries are rich in fiber, with 4 grams in a ½-cup cooked portion; a good source of protein with 6 grams per serving; and low in fat with 1 gram per serving. Wheat berries are energizing, and don’t make you feel tired, bloated and sluggish like many breakfast bowls of cereal do. Grain salads are easy to make ahead of time, and unlike greens, which can get soggy, they only benefit from soaking in their dressing. By using the intact wheat kernel, or berry, you’ll reap the full nutritional benefit, as well as the pleasantly nutty taste.

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